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    • #57217
      Randy Zimmermann
      Participant

      I’m running a Carter AFB with electric choke. The choke wasn’t connected when I purchased the car and, for the most part, it hasn’t been needed for cold starts on summer days. Nevertheless, it’s a small annoyance to me that I haven’t connected it.

      There’s no obvious place to connect the hot lead. I’ve read that you want to avoid tapping into anything that bleeds volts from the ignition system. Could I run a lead from the lower small post on the starter solenoid? Or is there a better source? Other suggestions? Thanks!

    • #62359

      I don’t think it draws much current (anyone know?) so I would connect it to the side of the fusebox that is hot when the ignition is on. You only want voltage going to the choke when running the car anyway. If it does draw a lot of current a separate fused line could be run from the connection on the voltage regulator that is hot when the ignition is on. Say several chants to Sir Joseph Lucas when making these connections and everything will be fine……………Eric

    • #62381

      If you have a standard fusebox (2 fuses) and wiring harness then you should connect it to the fusebox where the white wires connect. Put in an inline fuse for about 10 or 15 amps… better to be safe.

      Cheers,
      Theo

    • #62397
      Randy Zimmermann
      Participant

      Hello:

      Thank you for the suggestions. I connected it to the fusebox with an inline fuse. Seems to be working fine.

    • #62400

      i find it tricky to adjust the holley electric choke. if i have it turned enough to give a rich enough mixture when completely cold, it doesn’t back of all the way when warm.

      if i increase the cold idle screw enough to keep it running from the first cold crank, then the revs are too high for the first few minutes of driving.

      i eventually found a bit of a compromise but its not perfect.

    • #62403
      quote 65sunbeam:

      I don’t think it draws much current (anyone know?) so I would connect it to the side of the fusebox that is hot when the ignition is on. You only want voltage going to the choke when running the car anyway. If it does draw a lot of current a separate fused line could be run from the connection on the voltage regulator that is hot when the ignition is on. Say several chants to Sir Joseph Lucas when making these connections and everything will be fine……………Eric

      Yes they do draw a lot of current, and it is on all the time. If you must use it, run a new fused wire from the main regulator terminal to avoid system volt drops which affects lights, ignition etc.

      I modded my current Holley, and I am modifying my Carter to manual choke before fitting it as the choke is only needed for about a minute max after getting the car started.

    • #62472
      Randy Zimmermann
      Participant

      I’ve run a fused wire (10 amp) off the fuse box. It starts well and does seem to open up completely after warm up but I find it idles at a higher rpm, similar to the earlier post. If I continue to have problems or get annoyed with the higher idle, I may install a manual system like Chris has chosen to do. I just wanted to give the electric choke a try since it’s already there. In the final analysis, the choke is only needed at the very start and even then, usually on warm summer days.

    • #62473
      quote V Mad:

      I modded my current Holley, and I am modifying my Carter to manual choke before fitting it as the choke is only needed for about a minute max after getting the car started.

      Hi Chris,

      What exactly was the issue with the holley that you had to go to a manual choke? I am thinking about converting my manual choke Holley to an electric type. Where did you fit the choke knob?

      Thanks, Robin.

    • #62474

      Hi Robin
      I wired in my electric choke on the holley, and it worked OK, but when I realised how much power is was drawing constantly from the electrical system (I dont remember the figures) I decided a manual choke was better (especially if you have a dynamo fitted). I already had a choke cable fitted to the car, from a previous owner, in the position below and in between the fuel gauge and clock.

      Also any automatic choke on a classic car can be unreliable, so I prefer a manual one. But nowadays, with fuel injection on modern cars, a cold start enrichment is an integral part of the system.

    • #62478

      Hi Chris,

      Just going off topic slightly so sorry to others. I originally looked at a Edelbrock carbrettor for my four barrell conversion, but ended up buying a Holley. From your experience with the Holley, what made you go for the Carter? I believe the Carters are the same or very similar to the Edelbrock’s and have the reputation for being a bit more user friendly.

      Thanks, Robin.

    • #62479

      I got fed up with my Holleys and went Edelbrock on both the 62 and the Lister.Easy to adjust and no worries.
      I have 3 Holleys, 2 good ones and 1 with a cracked base if anyone is interested.

    • #62480

      I bought a new Holley in 1992 for my 260 MKI. I spent the next two years trying to set it up with no luck.

      I then went to an Edelbrock (same as a Carter), set the idle screws and took a 400 mile round trip the next day with absolutely no problems.

      It is now 2008 and I have yet to make any adjustments to that carb.

      Fred Baum

    • #62483

      I put my old 331 ci and auto in the other Tiger and put a Edelbrook carb on it and we have’nt touch anything for almost two years and that car gets driven alot.

    • #62484

      G’day Guys,

      Thanks for the replies. Maybe I should have held off buying the Holley. The one I have seems to be quite popular, so selling it should’nt be difficult. Some people seem to love the Holley’s and talk down the Carter’s/Edelbrock’s (especially the later one’s). I think the smallest Edelbrock is the 500 cfm which should be fine for the stock 260.

      Regards, Robin.

    • #62485
      quote gtsmrt:

      Hi Chris,

      Just going off topic slightly so sorry to others. I originally looked at a Edelbrock carbrettor for my four barrell conversion, but ended up buying a Holley. From your experience with the Holley, what made you go for the Carter? I believe the Carters are the same or very similar to the Edelbrock’s and have the reputation for being a bit more user friendly.

      Thanks, Robin.

      Robin, I bought the Carter at an autojumble for peanuts, so I could play around with it. My Holley is running OK, although a bit rich, so when I have cleaned and checked out the Carter fully & fitted new gaskets I will swap them over to see how they compare.

    • #62513

      Hi,

      Well I have gone and done it. All of the positive comments regarding the Edelbrock carburettors has sold me and I have purchased a brand new Edelbrock performer AFB 500cfm carby. I thought about going second hand, but i got the new one for such a good price I could not turn it down. I also sold the Holley 465 without fuss as well (maybe should have asked for more). I am looking forward to trying it out.

      Regards, Robin.

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