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    • #58138

      I want to install a tandem master cylinder and eliminate the booster.I understand a 3/4 diameter bore master will accomplish this.anyone know what off the shelf unit will work? thanks in advance. Bill

    • #65558

      I used a an Alpine I, II master with no booster on my Tiger it worked better with this setup than with the booster in place.

    • #65559
      Roger Nyberg
      Member

      CLASSIC MOTORSPORT MAGAZINE USED A SUBURU, DALES RESTORATION USED FORD (compact truck). Give Doug Jennings a call @TIGER AUTO in Dayton.

    • #65562

      settled on a late 70’s datsun passenger car.3/4" bore,tandem pistons for safety.will install shortly,the snow in new hampshire is actually beginning to melt.

    • #65565
      66tiger289
      Member

      Could you please post a part number for reference.

      Thanks

    • #65566

      I will.my local auto parts people located a core,it’s being re-built and will ship in 8 to 10 days.

    • #65569
      quote sunbeam2005:

      I used a an Alpine I, II master with no booster on my Tiger it worked better with this setup than with the booster in place.

      We "converted" our never-had-a-booster [since we got it] Tiger to this Alpine unit a few years ago, it is a nice set-up. Much less [leg] force required for braking.

      A "clean" change to a similar-sized dual-piston master cylinder certainly sounds like it would be safer… how "involved" are the other changes required?

    • #65570

      I’ll post all the gory details after we do the job.i’m old enough(65) to have experienced brake failures with single stage brakes and it isn’t fun.the pedal falls to the floor and absolutely nothing happens.crashed a couple cars that way.what brake fluid is required? I recall horror storys about seals disintegrating if the wrong fluid is used in a girling system.

    • #65571
      impbarn
      Member

      Brake fluid type is a bit like discussion religion. Its still a hot debate over what to use. In my experience for cars like ours which do not see daily use, DOT5 silicone fluid has significant benefits. It is essential to clean out the system entirely, and then install the DOT5 fluid properly. The common complaint is the DOT5 made my brakes spongy. That’s usually because it was applied incorrectly with a vacuum pump. We all know that DOT3 fluid is hydroscopic (absorbs water, which causes rust and corrosion). Well DOT5 is hygroscopic, it will absorb air. It must always be pushed through the system with pressure from the reservoir and the bottle should be fresh and never shaken. The other nice thing is that DOT5 will not eat paint if spilled accidentally.

      Here is another thread on the subject, with testimony from Tiger Tom:
      https://www.teae.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=983

      I’ve taken additional steps to insure all the air is out of mine, and my Alpine has a solid pedal with DOT5.
      Here’s a demonstration of all the air being boiled out of a sample of silicone brake fluid.

    • #65572

      I have been using the DOT5 brake fluid for over 20 years (also in the clutch system), have been pleased.

      I thought that in order to make the change you also need to replace all of the rubber in the system – seals, hoses, etc(?).

    • #65589

      Hi Eric,

      I suppose when you say you are boiling out the air bubbles your are really using a vacuum pump to evacuate the air? (You know that not everybody works in the air conditioning field and has access to a vacuum pump!).

      I hate to admit how long I have had silicon brake fluid in my 66 Alpine. Its got to be over 20 years and still holding. I remember it was a good name brand of silicon fluid. I think it was a GE product? In any case fellow motorists, I am going thru the car now and will be rebuilding and changing the fluid. However it is still working. Duel cylinders does seem like a good idea.

      I think and someone correct me if I am wrong that the boosted original cylinder was .75 (3/4") bore and the non boosted series I and II used a cylinder with a .625 (5/8") bore. I have driven my Alpine thousands of miles using the 5/8" bore cylinder and no booster and stainless covered flex hoses and have been really happy with the braking.

      Dave Reina

      quote ImpBarn:

      Brake fluid type is a bit like discussion religion. Its still a hot debate over what to use. In my experience for cars like ours which do not see daily use, DOT5 silicone fluid has significant benefits. It is essential to clean out the system entirely, and then install the DOT5 fluid properly. The common complaint is the DOT5 made my brakes spongy. That’s usually because it was applied incorrectly with a vacuum pump. We all know that DOT3 fluid is hydroscopic (absorbs water, which causes rust and corrosion). Well DOT5 is hygroscopic, it will absorb air. It must always be pushed through the system with pressure from the reservoir and the bottle should be fresh and never shaken. The other nice thing is that DOT5 will not eat paint if spilled accidentally.

      Here is another thread on the subject, with testimony from Tiger Tom:
      https://www.teae.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=983

      I’ve taken additional steps to insure all the air is out of mine, and my Alpine has a solid pedal with DOT5.
      Here’s a demonstration of all the air being boiled out of a sample of silicone brake fluid.

    • #65742

      have finished the conversion.works fine.used the following :federated#11-1840 master cyl,wildwood reservoirs3260-3386,clamps260-3386,filters260-3394,caps260-3392 from summit racing.made a 2" spacer for the firewall,pushrod from a 5/16 bolt.piped the forward group thru the original junction block on the fender well and the aft group thru the drivers side fender well similar to the original but on the opposite side.pedal effort is reasonable,like a british car with non power brakes.

    • #65774
      0neoffive
      Member
      quote sunbeam2005:

      I used a an Alpine I, II master with no booster on my Tiger it worked better with this setup than with the booster in place.

      This would suggest that the servo (booster) was not functioning in the first place.

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